Tag Archives: information

Don’t Forget AFSPA

28 Mar

AFSPAIn the run-up to the coming elections, there is an urgent need to create a political pressure for repeal of AFSPA. While political parties are focussing on secularism, democracy and development, they have completely ignored the long-standing demand of the people of Kashmir and North-East India to repeal AFSPA.  A march is being organised on 30th March, jointly by various organisations, activists and individuals  to bring the pressing demand to repeal AFSPA into the political theater before the elections. Join in to show your solidarity and support. 

When: Sunday 30th March, 1 pm onwards

Where: from Mandi House metro station to Jantar Mantar. 

All organisations can extend their support through participation in this march. Details will be updated from time to time at http://www.repealafspa.blogspot.in/


Jointly Organised By: Save Sharmila Solidarity Campaign, AIPWA, AISA, RYA, Voices Against 377, DSF, NAPM, Right Water Campaign & other like minded organisations

Contact info: savesharmila@gmail.com

What is AFSPA?

AFSPA or Armed Forces Special Powers Act, passed in 1958, rules all the north east states(except Sikkim) and Jammu and Kashmir. It was imposed to check insurgency. AFSPA allows shooting the “suspects” and provides legal immunity to the army men. Because of this, in the name of protecting law and order, AFSPA has led to extra judicial killingsfake encountersillegal detentionstorture and rapes. The law was enforced in Manipur in 1980 and was supposed to last six months but it continues to destroy it till today.

(Taken from http://www.repealafspa.blogspot.in/)

Why is AFSPA a queer feminist issue?

At the most basic level, it is an issue of human and democratic rights being grossly violated. You can read more about the violations under AFSPA here: http://repealafspa.blogspot.in/p/everyday-stories-of-torture.html

When the Supreme Court’s judgement upholding section 377  said that it only affects a ‘minuscule minority’ of Indians, many of us were rightly furious. A set of people can’t be treated badly because there are only a few of them. The government, constitution and state are all supposed to ensure that everyone in the country is treated equally and has equal access to their rights. In this case, several states are being systematically denied their rights and oppressed by violence, with no recourse to the law, and because of their minority/marginalised status, they cannot do anything about it. As queer people, we should stand in solidarity with them, because this is the same battle we are fighting, on another front. 

Violence under AFSPA is highly gendered: illegal kidnapping, rape, torture and murder all disproportionately affect women more. There are no substantiated studies about violence against trans* people under AFSPA but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist: trans* people are even less able to seek redressal against sexual or gendered violence than cis-gendered women. As queer women and genderqueer or trans* people, we should stand in solidarity against this violence.

 India supposedly prides itself on its diversity. At the same time, people who are different — who look different, who eat different food, who wear different clothes, who have sex differently, who believe or don’t believe in different faiths, who want different lives, — are constantly under pressure to conform. In a diverse country, wanting everyone to conform to one faith or ideology is as stupid as wanting them to speak only one language or follow only one sexuality. To do this via violence and oppression is even worse. So, as queer feminists, to ensure our own place in the diversity of possibilities, we have to stand in solidarity with others who are also trying to carve out their own spaces.

SC Verdict meetings and protests

13 Dec

COMMUNITY MEETING AND DISCUSSION
Max Mueller Bhavan, 6:30pm, Saturday, December 14th.

Gather to understand the judgment, talk, share, vent, come together.
This event is not open to the media — it’s a space for the community (of all genders and sexualities) to come together, discuss, think through what’s going on and where to go from here. Informal and unstructured, but we’ll have a few legal experts start by breaking down the judgment.

Spread the word! The event will be in English and Hindi with translation both ways.

Metro: Patel Chowk/Rajiv Chowk.

– Voices Against 377
GLOBAL DAY OF RAGE – NO GOING BACK!!
Jantar Mantar, 3 pm, Sunday, December 15th.

On December 11th, 2013, The Supreme Court of India reinstated the Criminality of Homosexuality in India. This Judgment has inspired anger across different sections of society around the world. While the legal battle continues, it is important that we make our voices heard. Loud and Clear.

This Judgment is not about any one community in any one country but about the hegemonic structures that oppress many across the world. It is a blow to the various other LGBTIQ communities across the world who might have …taken strength from the Indian story to challenge laws/social norms/prejudices that criminalise homosexuality in their own countries. It is time we begin to heal this lasting scar of colonialism. It is time we are given the space and freedom to pursue the work of fundamental social change which is made impossible with a law such as Sec. 377 of the Indian Penal Code choking us.

Gather your friends, lovers and anyone else who is enraged by this injustice. Make your voices heard.

Events are happening in many cities across the world! Organise one in yours or join one that is happening!
 
For more details:
Global Day of Rage, Delhi: www.facebook.com/events/168797849996585
Global Day of Rage, World-wide: www.facebook.com/events/168797849996585

Another way to break the myths

26 Jun

Kyaa tumne sochaa hai ki chitron mein pyaar kaise dikhaayaa jaaye? Kisi vastu kaa chitra banaana to aasaan hai, lekin pyaar, jo ki ek ehsaas hai, use kaise chitrit kiya jaaye?” (Have you ever thought about how love can be depicted in a painting? It’s easy to draw an object, but love is a feeling; how do you sketch that?)

These are lines taken from a double-page spread in the February issue of Chakmak, a Bhopal-based science magazine aimed at children between eleven and fifteen years of age. The words were accompanying a painting by the late Indian artist Bhupen Khakkar. The painting shows two young men sitting on a couch, nestled close to each other. Each one’s limbs follow the curves of the other’s. The quiet, contented smiles of two lovers wearing identical suits speak more about love than a lot of books. As the caption says, “Ve ek-doosre se itnaa pyaar karte the ki unhone ek hi jaisaa suit pehnaa thaa.” (They loved each other so much that they wore suits of the same design) Not only is this an admirably direct attempt to confront the abstract, (as the aforementioned question about love tried to) but also to educate children about homosexuality, an issue which can enmesh children in a quagmire of half-truths and downright irresponsible myths/legends.

Read more — and see the lovely painting — here at NewsYaps.

 

Myths and Facts

26 Jun
चाहत पिटारा, अंक 96  निरंतर- जेंडर और शिक्षा का सन्दर्भ समूह   नई दिल्ली और लखनऊ

चाहत पिटारा, अंक 96
निरंतर- जेंडर और शिक्षा का सन्दर्भ समूह
नई दिल्ली और लखनऊ

चाहत पिटारा, अंक 96  निरंतर- जेंडर और शिक्षा का सन्दर्भ समूह   नई दिल्ली और लखनऊ

चाहत पिटारा, अंक 96
निरंतर- जेंडर और शिक्षा का सन्दर्भ समूह
नई दिल्ली और लखनऊ

चाहत पिटारा, अंक 96  निरंतर- जेंडर और शिक्षा का सन्दर्भ समूह   नई दिल्ली और लखनऊ

चाहत पिटारा, अंक 96
निरंतर- जेंडर और शिक्षा का सन्दर्भ समूह
नई दिल्ली और लखनऊ